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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)
, supervisor london breed will probably be arriving later and will make her welcoming remarks towards the end of the program. following the invocation by reverend harlan jones, nor a griffin will make a presentation, a dramatic presentation on the negro national anthem which will be followed by the singing of the negro national anthem. with that, i'd like to ask reverend jones if he would come forward for the invocation. (applause) >> let us bow our heads. unite our hearts in prayer. eternal god, creator of the world, sustainer of life and lord of history, thou art great and beyond our power to fully know or comprehend. so, god, we come today to give you thanks for both the ordinary and extraordinary mercies of our lives. we thank you for the gift of living in a city where the richness and diversity of races and cultures is celebrated. and as we begin this celebration of african-american history month, we remember with fondness those who worked and sacrificed to make a life for themselves and their people. we remember those who marched, who sat in, who were jailed and who lost their lives tha
that downton abbey experience but also ssme of the great sites thht you cannsee in london and -3 arounddeurope." if you're on aabudget you can hopp &pa train to the castle frrm london.gill says: "the aaiest paddiigton station anddyou go about a orty fivveminute trrin ide out. it's a very ppeasanttride." or rent - a roadster and choose your own addenture to highclere..murphhy - says: whatti would suggest iss people ttink about is mmking london you huu of your stay -&pand divinn down and experiencing hiihclere castle -3 for the day and thee driving 3& vikiin river cruisss is one of tte spoosors of downton abbey.gill says: "they're offering an extensioo of one of their existing rivee cruises to england. it consssts of a three day toou of londonnand then it movvs on po some of the countryyide -3& including a tour of hhghclere castle. murphh says: because &pthese folks buy n bulk bring hundreds, if not thhusaads of people to highclere castle -3&pthey get a special rate at the hotee. speciallrate n terrs &pof trannfer. special rate in - terms of ent
're watching al-jazeera live from london. also coming up on the program -- thousands rally in tunisia in support of the government and against the the prime minister's plan to dissolve it. the search goes on but there's no trace of the meteorite that left a trail of destruction across central russia and the winner is, we'll be live from the berlin film festival with news of who's got the golden bear. thank you for joining us. a bomb targeting people shopping for vegetables has once again highlighted pakistan's deep sectarian tension. at least 60 have been killed in an explosion in the southwestern city of quetta. more than 200 were injured when a bomb exploded outside a market. police say it was aimed at the region's minority shia population. attacks in quetta have killed more than 200 in the past month. we have the latest from islamabad. what more do we know about this attack? >> hi, barbara. what we know is that this bomb, which went off in this market was very powerful bomb. it was an improvised explosive device
others may see as a disability. here's dr. gupta. >> two olympics, six gold medals, beijing, london, a landful of world records, world championship titles and six london marathon wins. david weir is one of the top pair everyone had athletes in the world competing in long distance races. he's also confined to a wheelchair. all of it pure upper body strength. >> i couldn't feel my leg buzz they can't move. it's called spinal cord transection. it was damage to the nerves in my spine. the doctors don't know the how or when or why. so it was a disability from birth really. >> he was just a young boy when he decided not to let his disability keep him from his dreams of being an athlete. >> i was into sport very early. at school, it was my best subject. pe. i wasn't very good at anything else. so i knew that i had to get the sport right if i wanted to succeed in life. and i was very lucky and i was talented at an early age, and wheelchair racing took over my life. >> he began training in ernest at age 8 joining team great britain by 11 and started winning medals at the age of 25. >> i've d
, a paralympian and olympian who continues to shatter records as we saw in london this summer. welcome. >> thank you very much. >> how does it feel to be an inspiration for literally people who are disabled the entire world over? >> i think it's a massive blessing. i have been very privileged to be given a talent and over the last seven or eight years i have worked hard on working on it and being the best athlete i can be and being an international sportsman is a big responsibility and coming with it, you have to remember there are kids who look up to you, is definitely something you have to keep at the back of your mind. >> what somebody said to me, the amazing thing you have done, oscar, for all those kids who have lost a leg, two legs, the amputation they have suffered. in the old days, they were so stigmatized, they were picked on at school, they feel different. what you have done is make it cool to be an amputee, which may not be your intention, but they all want to be like oscar now. >> i grew up in a family where a disability was never an issue. we really didn't speak about my disability,
the war thing ?appened i >> the animals were over. i was in l.a., and i did not want to go to london and face the press. i love l.a.. it was great. i said, i am going to the actors studio. i signed up for the actors studio and had a great teacher, and i was doing well. i really enjoyed it. they said, if you want to do that, you have got to earn money in the field you are in. put a new band together. they said, we see you as a black band. i saw this events that had a trombone, trumpets, saxophone, bass. i said, we cannot take this on the road and make money. eventually we got it down to six brands and myself. -- bands and myself. it was wonderful for a couple years. it was really good, but the surprising thing was i got a shot. for the first time i realized black americans did not understand what the blues was all about. once it went on record, they sold. tavis: we have this conversation all the time, so i feel you on that. tell me about "til your river runs dry!" >> it began with a conversation -- a conversation with gorbachev. we got a song in the works. the problem is water in this
scientists. annabelle roberts, nbc news, london. >> now, your insta weather plus forecast with meteorologist john collins. >> now two things a little more down to earth, a little less astronomical. we are seeing a storm here, that passed through as a cold front last night and early morning. it is still kicking precipitation back. mostly east of the bay. central and southern portions of the bay, a little bit of southern maryland. most of it is light snow. could be a little rain mixed in, especially in the south. heaviest precipitation in the form of snowflakes right along the coastline. whatever it is there is of melting as it hits the ground. that will be around for tonight and part of tomorrow as well. more on that in a minute or it 37 was the high at the airport -- minutes. 37 was the high at the airport. we take a look at the precipitation yesterday, at midnight, 4/100 of an inch. today we are just above normal,, n inch has fallen into the bucket. we're in the mid-30's. it will not get to to the 20's until we drop into western maryland. satellite image shows the coastal storm development
sportscaster and fox news analyst, jim gray, who interviewed pistorius at the london games last summer. jim, let me begin by simply saying to you, you met him. you spoke with him. what did you think? >> i was speaking to him at the height of his life. he said it was a moment that he would cherish forever. he had just completed the race. he finished last. but after so many years of trying and being thrown out by the iaaf if getting his appeal overturned by the arbitration court, being able to appear after not being able to appear in beijing and then on the track in london, he said it was the highlight of his life. he said he had cramps in his cheeks from smiling so much. he had felt he would have an impact on the entire world for the rest of his life because he was the first guy to be a double amputee to compete. so it was a special moment for him. so i saw him at the height of his life and it was only a four-minute interview. 3 1/2 minutes. of course, he was respectful, courteous, on time. he was all those things that a guy in that position you would expect. but to say that i know him, i do
for loopholes that could save the millions in taxes. >> now, a london-based group is trying to change that. >> can these men stop global companies from dodging taxes around the world? tax officials from australia, britain, and china analyze complex schemes to reduce company tax burdens. this one leaves from england to australia, taking advantage of tax havens along the way. the authority of tax officials often ends at the border. investigators request information from authorities and other countries, but it is often not enough. >> when you start looking at very complex affairs, then a simple letter is rarely sufficient to fully explore the issues. by working together, we are able to understand the cultural differences that exist between our different countries. >> in britain, u.s. coffeehouse starbucks sparked outrage when it was revealed the company paid very little tax in the u.k. its trick was to pay high licensing fees to reduce its corporate tax rate. activists say starbucks is no exception. >> there's a lot of online-based companies like amazon, google, facebook, that are avoiding ta
attention during the london olympic games. he competed in 11 races, setting records and winning medals. american olympian blake reaper came in second to him in one race. he considers him a competitor and also a friend. he joins us. good evening, sir. >> good evening. thank you for having me. >> before we get to the more serious matter, i do want to congratulate you because you will be the first american to compete in the olympics disabled and now being 2016. i tip my hat to you, congratulations. >> thank you so much. it will be a long journey but it started when i saw oscar run on tv for the first time. >> let me talk to you about him. oscar is a huge hero to disabled athletes, is he not? >> yes. he's a huge hero to disabled athletes, not only disabled athletes but anybody in general. anybody and everybody who faces challenges in life can look up to oscar and relate to challenges of his. >> i think you are right. it includes everybody because he captivated everybody's attention and everybody admired him and add meyers him so immensely for all he has achieved. this is very perplexing. w
with the very latest from london and good day to you, annabelle. new numbers on how big this was and the kind of damage it did. pretty outstanding. >> reporter: that's right, alex. good morning. a big cleanup going on in chelybinsk. the shock wave blew out windows in more than 4,000 buildings. this is a really cold area. local officials promised they will get all the windows fixed within a week. that's a long time to wait when your midday temperature there is about 10 fahrenheit. so lots of people out there today, busy blocking up the windows and the glazers will be extremely busy the next few days. 1,200 people injured, 200 children. 15 remain in the hospital, 1 in a coma. most injuries caused by flying, breaking glass as you can see in the pictures. what happened, the meteor flew across the sky, everybody saw the strange light, ran to the windows and, boom, all the windows -- the huge blast and the glass shattered in those winos across this area. there were also reports that a chunk had fallen into a lake, a chunk of the meteor. divers are busy looking for the large chunk under this ice-cru
of how the world has changed is more ipo's were done in shanghai last year than in london and new york combined. all right? it tells you where the world is shifting. why do they need more lawyers? they understand that they want to be the dominant economic and business powerhouse in the world. they look at the american model. they need lawyers to make those deals. i would advise them to have a quality legal education. that is opposed to brazil, where you have 1000 law schools, you can open a law school for a couple hundred bucks, and they have a huge failure rate. we are working with the brazilians, other colleges, law schools. i spoke to their major university about these issues, and they are doing what they can to increase. i would tell them to make sure that the legal education is a quality legal education. it is the first of to have a monopoly, so you can control the lawyers, and make sure they are acting in an ethical way. i think there was a third part of the question, what would i tell them not to do. by the way, before i get to that, in vietnam, i recently met with the president
, cbs news, london. >> axelrod: police in pakistan say at least 65 people are dead and 200 wounded after a bombing today stay crowded market. it happened in the city of quetta. the bomb was set off by remote control while dozens of women and children were doing their weekend shopping. the vatican says it may move up the conclave to choose a new pope. pope benedict, who met with italy's prime minister today in one of his last private audiences, steps down february 28. the conclave, currently set for mid-march, could happen sooner if the cardinals approve. now to southern california and questions facing the sheriff of san bernardino county about his department'sing of the deadly standoff with former l.a. cop christopher dorner. carter evans tells us the sheriff is standing by his deposit. >> reporter: authorities are now releasing more details about christopher dorner's final hours. we were caught in the cross-fire, a gun battle that lasted nearly an hour. then silence. swat team leader greg herbert: >> there was no response from the suspect, none, no movement. and we felt that, based upon
, you might recall, at the london olympics as the first double a.m. amputee to compete. >> i don't know what might be. he's my inspiration. i'm really disappointed. >> prosecutors in south africa say they plan to charge pistorius with premeditated murder, the most serious criminal charge in the kcountry. known as the blade runner for his prosthetic legs, he was hailed as a hero in south africa. >>> it seems the waiting never stops for the passengers of that carnival "triumph" cruise. getting off the ship wasn't the end of the nightmare for many. one of the buses carrying the passengers home broke down. it was going from alabama to new orleans. they were stuck for an hour before another bus came to pick them up. an engine fire killed power and left the ship stranded in the gulf for four days. it finally got towed into land last night. >> driving on the highway, the bus starts slowing down and the bus pulls over and breaks down. >> how long were you there? >> about an to transport all the luggage to the new bus. >> so many delays on land and at sea. now carnival says it will refund everyo
girlfriend. double amputee who ran on blades in london appeared in court in south africa. he bowed his head and sobbed as the judge read the charge. yesterday his girlfriend 30-year-old model reef a was shot and killed inside his home. prosecutors say they will pursue a premeditated murder dear charge against him. he says is innocent. >>> swedish photographer won the world press photo award for 2012. wing photo shows 2 children killed in is israeli mission strike in gaza city. jurors say the contrast of the anger and the sorrow of the adults with innocence of the children makes it a picture worth remembering. it's stunning. >> other winning image routed in the gaza conflict. man kis kissing the hand of relative who died. school children walking beten debris of damaged school. woman in syria crying after the syrian army shelled her house killing her husband and 2 children. grief in her eye so clearly. >> woman in kenya taking a break from pecking up the trash. such a stark scene that is. >> and jockey strapped to bull and clutching their tail during competition in indonesian. some of
,005 at the others were offered. absolutely. the other thing, they could have london back from mexico. apparently the could have gone to mexico and avoided. then they didn't want to because of the cost. guess what, the bigger cost now. gerri: people are not happy. >> this is just a first lawsuit of many. gerri: thank you for coming on. you're going to come back. at the bottom of the hour, your verdict on a graduate student suing her alma maters for giving her bad grades. this student says it i costing her money, but is it legal? add up think so. that's just my view. also, we head to the crown jewel , new york fashion week. president obama calling for renaissance and manufacturing. what does it mean? of break it all down next. @í ♪ >> there are things we can do right elbow to accelerate the resurgence of american manufacturing. number one, we can create more centers fo high-tech manufacturing in america. and calling on congress to help us set up 15 institutes, global centers of high-tech jobs and advanced manufacturing around the country. gerri: well, that was the president this week in north c
, the boom, and all the shattered glass. jim bolden, cnn, london. >> amazing. let's dig in a little deeper with physicist and cosmologist lawrence krauss. he's made a career of explaining for people like me and you everything from how the tiniest particles behave to how the universe will end. he is the director of the origins project at arizona state university and his latest book is called "a universe from nothing." we spoke earlier tonight. professor, thank you for joining us. our first question is how was this meteor able to do so much damage? >> well, it's a 10 ton or 20 ton sized object going 30,000 miles per hour. suddenly stopping in the atmosphere. you can imagine it's a lot worse than getting hit by a truck. >> i mean, i don't really understand how it works. tell me, what is it about this flying piece of space matter that makes such damage when it comes in? you say the speed and i guess temperature, but it really blew out windows so far away. people falling down. even though it was big, how did it do so much damage? >> well, you know, when a space shuttle comes in and is designed
came after you were, went to sequoia. so you're in london. you talk to the man a the dailtime anhe says i would go to america. that is where i would go. >> yeah. >> rose: so you come here. >> i came here and i couldn't afford to come here. so i applied for a bunch of scholarships to american universities and luckily enough got one that took me to the university of pennsylvania. >> rose: wharton. >> well, actually, no. not originally. it was for a masters in history. and then i wasn't too happy with the first few weeks of that program. and was wondering what else to do. because i knew i wanted to be in america. and they were very kind and let me transfer into the business school. but the very best thing that happened to me there was having-- being in a class with the author philip roth. so my binding memory of the university of pennsylvania is being introduced to philip roth and he had these people like norman mailer and other people who would come through the class a that s just fantastic. >> rose: you make your way to "time" magazine. >> yes. >> rose: and you write about steve jobs. >>
. that was true in aig which ran most of its swaps business out of mayfair, a part of london, but it was also true at lehman brothers, citigroup, bear stearns, long-term capital management. i think failing to incorporate this basic lesson of modern finance into our oversight of swaps market would not only fall short of your direction to the cftc and dodd/frank but i also think it would leave the public at risk. i believe dodd/frank reform does apply and we have to complete the rules to apply to transactions entered into branches of u.s. institutions offshore off if they're guaranteed affiliates offshore transacting with each other or even if it is a hedge fund that happens to be incorporated hedg incorporated in an island ar off shore but really operated here. i'd like just to turn with the remaining minute to these cases the cftc brought on live war because it's so much of our 2013 agenda. the u.s. treasury collected $2 billion from the justice department in cftc fines. but that's not the key part of this. what's really important is ensuring financial market integrity. when a reference rate such
his fwoif. i remember mentioning it briefly in london. that's about it. he never went into much detail about her or the relationship or anything like that. >> steve, when you interviewed pistorius for your document lon the paralympics, you know the challenges he went through. did you see a different side to him? a short temper? >> no, i first met him in beijing in 2008. and he's the nicest, the most affable guy. we're shooting a movie called "the invincibles." we started five years ago. and you know, he spent three to four to five years with every journalist. i can't remember meeting anybody nicer or kinder which is why this is just so bizarre. when we first heard about it, two, three days ago. so yeah -- honestly, the nicest guy i've met. >> we keep hearing that. how did you feel when you first heard the news? >> you know, it's become surreal. i'm thinking it's a hoax. there's just -- it doesn't make sense. how this guy could fall from grace so quickly after, you know, rising so fast, it -- it's bizarre. i've been fortunate to, you know, hang out and meet and -- spend time with blake
back in september in london. that was it. he never went into much detail about her or much about the relationship. >> you interviewed pistorius for your documentary in the 2012 paralynpics. you know oscar, what he's made of. did you ever see a different side of him, maybe a short temper? >> no. i first met him in beijing in 2008. he is the nicest, most affable guy. we're shooting a movie called the invincibles. we started it five years ago. he spent three to four to five hours with every single journalist. i can't remember meeting anybody nicer or kinder, which is why this is just so bizarre when we first heard about it two or three days ago. yeah, the nicest guy i've ever met. >> we keep hearing that, steven. how did you feel when you first heard the news? >> it's become surreal. i'm thinking it's a hoax. it doesn't make sense, how this guy could fall from grace so quickly after, you know, rising so fast. it's bizarre. i've been fortunate to, you know, hang out and meet and spend time with the american blade runner and i just know that he was his mentor and that blake is going t
: no. >> eric: could be london. you have another one here. >> beth: this is not as big, but the black in this is so dense. >> yeah, hopefully you can see it on tv. one of the things, this is an ola tv. that's the technology in the screens on some of your phones. super high quality. they've been having a hard time getting them bigger. tv size. this is a model from samsung. a prototype. they're going to have one in the second half of the year. lg will have one the first half of the year. it combines the things that we like about plasma, which has the unlimited viewing angle, extremely black, as you can see. the colors really pop off that tv. some of the things we like about l t.d., it's the thickness of a pencil, really, really thin. and it's very energy efficient.. >> eric: where is this going? we first have the flat screens. >> it is dramatic. a lot of them are dramatic. the first time you see one, it's something that had stops you in your tracks and hopefully people will be buying them. >> arthel: i got to tell you, how much is this one? >> this one, there is no price set on this one
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)